Throughout our history, the YMCA has worked to meet the ever-changing needs of our diverse communities and provide a place where people of all backgrounds can gather to create positive social changes. The Y has been privileged to support African American leaders who have moved our country forward.

In 1906, the Association organized the 9th Street YMCA for Colored Men and Boys, referred to in the shorthand of the time as “the Colored Branch.” Instead of setting up a separate corporation to be kept at arm’s length, as was the practice among YMCAs, the Los Angeles YMCA elected to make this branch part of the Association. By 1909 the Colored Branch had its first building, at 9th and Hemlock Streets, an impressive achievement given that much of YMCA programming, for both blacks and whites, was still being done in borrowed assembly rooms of churches and schools. Years later the branch changed its name to the 28th Street Branch when it received a new building at that address. Its building was designed by renowned African American architect Paul Williams. Williams would go on to design the Hollywood YMCA and serve on the Metropolitan Board itself in the 1930s becoming its first African American director at a time when few if any governing boards were racially mixed.

 

BLACK LEADERSHIP IN L.A.

Because of her unshakeable faith in the YMCA, Dr. Genevieve Shepherd made sure that her campus hosted YMCA after-school programs for more than 20 years.

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

In 1927, Paul Revere Williams' firm was hired to expand and improve the Hollywood YMCA. The building is currently listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

WORD OF THE WEEK

AARN Words of the week
Language is ever-changing. The purpose of the Diversity, Inclusion, Global and Multicultural Development (DIGMD) Glossary of Terms is to help ground a common language across the Y Movement...

MUST WATCH VIDEO

“What I try to tell young people is that if you come together with a mission, and it's grounded with love and a sense of community, you can make the impossible possible.” Congressman & Civil Rights Leader - Rep. John Lewis

WE WEAR BLACK

aarn we wear black
On February 26 wear black, post your photo, and tag #WeWearBlack @globalymca


STAFF SPOTLIGHT

Get to know our African American Resource Network team members and changemakers within the LA Y.

OUR AARN LEADERSHIP 

Daria L. Price

DARIA L. PRICE
Senior Vice President, Information Technology
YMCA OF METROPOLITAN LOS ANGELES 

Sheldon Gibson

SHELDON W. GIBSON, JR.
Regional Teen Director
YMCA OF METROPOLITAN LOS ANGELES 

 


 

YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles’ Commitment to All Statement

The Y is made up of people from all backgrounds working together to strengthen their community. Together we work to ensure that everyone, regardless of ability, age, cultural background, disability, ethnicity, faith, gender, gender identity, ideology, immigrant status, income, race, sex, or sexual orientation has the opportunity to reach their full potential. We share the core values of Caring, Honesty, Respect, and Responsibility – they guide everything we do. The Y is committed to providing programs and services that are inclusive and welcoming to all. We value an environment that fosters dignity, respect, fairness, and appreciation for all aspects and dimensions of diversity.

 

 

 

Diversity, Inclusion, and Global (DIG) Engagement Mission Statement

At the YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles, we believe we are at our best when we are focused on equity and have fully integrated the practices of Diversity, Inclusion, & Global Engagement into all areas of our operations!

 

 


 

Interested in joining the African American Resource Network? 

Get Started Here